Blair Quasnitschka – Secrets to Successful Senior Living

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Blair Quasnitschka - Secrets to Successful Senior Living
Blair Quasnitschka – Secrets to Successful Senior Living

With the elderly, a fast-growing demographic in the U.S., senior housing issues are taking center stage.

The rising cost of living, limited options, chronic health problems, and inaccessibility caused by decreased mobility are just some of the housing problems facing the aging population. A successful senior living community is a team effort. In order to provide compassionate care and a fulfilling quality of life for each resident, a TEAM EFFORT is required.

The senior living industry faces many challenges, including difficulty COVID-related occupancy, clinical risk management, repairing the damaged mental health of residents, workforce and staff issues, and residents’ financial status. These are just some of the challenges the senior living industry is currently facing. Without a doubt, these are difficult times for those in this sector.
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Bio:

For the last 15 years, Blair Quasnitschka has served in senior living and senior care communities. He is experienced with single and multi-site operations/licensed nursing home administrator with a strong focus on customer excellence, team member engagement, strategic planning, and expense management.

He is also active in local advocacy for seniors and a Director for the National Board for the American College of Healthcare Administrators.

Blair’s LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blair-q-17923867/

Transcript:

Hanh:
Hi, I’m Hanh Brown, the host of the Boomer Living Broadcast. On the show, industry leaders share information inspiration in advice for those who care for seniors, our expert panelists discuss topics like senior health care, dementia care giving technology for seniors and affordable senior living. All of which address the social determinants of health. So thank you so much for participating in today’s conversation. Also check out Care stream our recently launched platform where we match seniors with caregiver. And guide businesses and their employees through the care giving journey for the loved ones. So check out Care stream. So today’s topic is secret to successful senior living with the elderly, a fast growing demographic in the US. Senior housing issues are taking center stage. The rising costs of living the limited options, chronic health problems in, in assess ability caused by decreased mobility or trust some of the housing problems facing the aging population. The senior living industry faces many challenges, including difficulty. COVID related occupancy, clinical risk management, repairing the damage mental health of residence. Workforce and staff issues and resident’s financial status. So these are just some of the challenges that senior living industry’s currently facing without a doubt. These are difficult times for those in the sector. So joining me today is Blair for the last 15 years, Blair for the last 15 years, Blair has served in the senior living in care. And senior care communities he is experienced with single and multi-site operations, licensed nursing home administrator with a strong focus and customer excellent team member engagement, strategic planning, and expense management. He’s also active in the local advocacy for seniors and a director for the national board for the American College of Healthcare Administrators. So Blair, welcome to the show.

Blair:
Pleasure to be here. Im doing just fine. It’s a rainy day in Charlotte here, but, all things considered, we’re we’re doing just fine. And here with representing senior living communities. I’ve worked with for the past four and a half years. Um, my career mostly was in a skilled nursing. I was a second generation licensed nursing home administrator. My father was in the profession before he passed, but so, I worked in the SNIF setting for about 10 years before making a pivot to a CCRC model, which currently, we’re going to organization I’m with now with the 15 properties, about half on a CCRC and the other half or a make-up of, ILAL, AL Memory Care Sniff. So, sort of, different at each community a little bit different chemistry, but yeah, so it’s been about four and a half years now currently serve as the vice president of operations and I support seven of our products.

Hanh:
Well, thank you. And congratulations on your role and thank you so much for coming back. Right.

Blair:
There are second, a second. Sit down. So thank you for having me back.

Hanh:
Absolutely. Well, a successful senior living community, clearly as a team sport in order to provide compassionate care and fulfilling quality of life for each resident, team effort is required. In other words, thriving community requires a village, but as you may be aware, senior living industry has some of the highest turnover rate. So creating. Stable and satisfying work environment helps retain employees, keeping residents and adult children happy. So I guess the best kept secret to increasing senior living occupancy is engaged and motivated staff. So Blair w what do you think like which companies do you see as leaders in customer and employee engagement and in what makes them great employers and staff?

Blair:
Yeah, without identifying them by name. I think some general characteristics around who is doing it well are definitely companies that take an intentional approach. To engaging with their team members that can be done many different forms. One way we endorse here is through the Great Place to Work. Survey, through the National Organization of Great Place to Work. And I think it’s important. It’s not something you can just pay to get, to get branded. You really need to hit on critical team member, engagement, satisfaction metrics in order to achieve branding from Great Place to Work. So I think that that helps to put some backbone to how your organization is connecting with your team members. I think other ways. When you have a home office organization that is present in the communities and shows some, some real direct support with the communities, rounding is essential. So to have the home office actually out there partnered with the team members, the leadership of the, of the communities I think is really essential. And we are resourced well enough here where we’re not so spread out or so big where we don’t have the resources to put our leadership from the home office. Side-by-side with the team members and the communities. I think that’s essential.

Hanh:
So, how do you, I guess, how can doing good for others, help someone feel better about their job?

Blair:
I think it starts with hiring the right people. Uh, this is the type of industry that is not for everybody. Uh, we, we say that right off the bat. One of the things I talk about. Uh, an orientation would be, if you are not naturally inclined to serve or you can’t reach down and grab it fairly easily, then this is probably not going to be the right place for you. So I think it starts with hiring people who actually want to serve. And that doesn’t matter if it’s the, you know, the person bedside, or if it’s someone in administration or in housekeeping, really takes anybody who is working in our environment. You need to want to serve. The residents, their families and each other, I think is critical to understand that our type of environment typically has departments, right. Segregated by some title of department, but to bring those together, in order to have people understand where each department’s coming from and that there’s an intention to serve each other as well, to put forward the best experience for our residents. So I think it really starts out with hiring people that innately are, you know, gravitate to want to serve people. Those people will then feel fulfillment in the mission of serving others.

Hanh:
Yeah, I agree. So do you have an example of how improving customer service made people feel more fulfilled at work?

Blair:
Yeah. What we typically have done is, you capitalize on sharing those moments of satisfaction and engagement. And when you, when you share those with the team members, I think that’s a particularly, what gets across to the team members, just how impactful they can be. One example recently that one of our executive directors, we use a communication, broad communication device called Regroup. And this, executive director, Chris Thorpe, great guy really, leads with his heart. He put out a message to his team members just saying, thank you. Just saying thank you for showing up where typically these messages are all about the latest COVID outbreak and the latest protocol. He really just made this message about saying. And nothing is more powerful than that right now is just to feel appreciated and feel heard. I would take a similar approach if we had an all staff meeting, I would always start that meeting reading a card that I received from a resident or a family member and just doing what we can to really highlight, the staff’s efforts.

Hanh:
So basically what I hear is sharing the wind. It’s not a solo individual win it’s a team win. Right. And then gratitude, towards day-to-day small tasks big tasks.

Blair:
It tends to be a punitive business that we work in when the state comes in or they’re not coming in to tell you what you’re doing, right. A lot of the reports we produce as a company, unfortunately we don’t tend to hone in on what’s going well. Unfortunately, even the survey processes in terms of satisfaction, surveys and whatnot, I would venture to say most people are that fill those out, not even in our industry. Just think about your own life typically. You’re we default to when something went wrong. Oh, I got to tell someone about that. So it tends to be a punitive business. So I think it’s, it’s really critical that you take the opportunity to, to share when, like you said, share the win.

Hanh:
So do you believe that staff engagement has a direct or indirect effect on the overall satisfaction of customers?

Blair:
Oh, I, I believe so. Uh, I think it’s direct. I don’t think there’s anything indirect about it. I think when there is engagement from a company at the company level, at the local level, with leadership in the community, with your team members, they feel heard, they feel supported, they feel recognized. I just think naturally that is going to them. Have them have a greater investment in what they’re putting forward in terms of their operation and their contribution to the operation. So, I think it goes without saying that when you’re more engaged with your team members, they’re going to be more vested in what they’re putting forward on behalf of the company.

Hanh:
So, how can you engage more with your staff to create a higher level of customer satisfaction?

Blair:
Sure. A few different tangible tactics. Number one is rounding. For some people it’s tough for them to get out from the desk. It as simple as if you have to put that on your outlook calendar that reminds you to get out and around. I know some people who take it that literally, that they have to put reminders for themselves. And, and that’s fine that the, you could do it that way. I think nocturnal visits are critical. Uh there’s a lot of times people work off shifts. It could have to do with a domestic situation. It could have to do with school education situation. That doesn’t mean they’re any less important to the operation. So, again, if not just the executive director, but if department heads in general are rounding off shift and that doesn’t mean just for their department, you know, it’s, again, it kind of goes back to everybody in it together. Uh it’s it’s great. When I see that a department head, is there rounding off shift and actually talking and interacting with other departments and getting some feedback. Stay interviews are critical, figuring out why people are staying, figure out if they’re happy. Uh, and. That that can be done with longevity and that can be done with new hires. I think part of what we’ve seen is in hiring, we lose a lot of people in that first 30 to 60 days. So trying to dive in and not necessarily leaving it up to a supervisor, I’m more intentional with letting the actual department head get out there and do those stay interviews with the line staff to get that granular with their piece of the operation, I think is critical. Um, There’s one thing that I created and I shared with everyone I’ve worked with is basically a, an employee appreciation calendar. If you look up across the board, every one of our departments has a recognition date, somewhere along the lines, and a calendar year. We very much default to national nursing week, which is critical CNA week, which is, which is critical. Uh, but there is everything from. Uh, international food service a week. There is a healthcare I want to say it’s a healthcare facility engineering week, which I think I’ve always recognized the maintenance department. There is transportation appreciation day sales person appreciation day. Uh, so I’ve really been very intentional with honoring that calendar. Uh, and I think it goes a long way. Uh there’s there’s something to be said for, for wages and, and always being cognizant of, of where someone is on the wage scale and, and doing your, your market adjustments. But a lot goes into, I think is just the recognition efforts locally, and nothing replaces a handwritten card. I will say that. Time and time again. Uh, whenever I do a site visit, I try to walk away and send back to that community two or three cards of people that I interacted with. Just pointing it out saying thank you. Thanks for taking the time and mentioned something anecdotally to what we talked about. But nothing replaces getting a card from someone that you are really counting on for feedback. And, and that shows that you’re caring.

Hanh:
Yeah, no, that’s, that’s really important regardless of what industry, we’re human beings. We appreciate that. Acknowledgement validation and that you’re appreciated. Right. And that’s appreciation isn’t based on your title, your salary. It’s because I value you. I value that you’re here. So that’s great. Now for those in the audience, we love to hear from you. So comment in the below sections, if you have any questions, cause we’re glad that you’re here. All right. So let’s talk about how can companies handle clients who come in for a consultation, but don’t move in because they’re unhappy?

Blair:
Yeah, let’s face it. The idea to move into senior living is probably not. On a senior’s radar as something that’s top three things they want to do. Uh, right. So, and the stigma involved involving senior living is still something we’re we’re beating back. So, I think for many meeting them where they are is critical. That will help us understand sort of the psychology of what’s going to go into their decision. If we treat every prospect with the same cookie cutter and we just try to shove X community down their throat, we’re doing a disservice to them. Uh, so I think it’s really important to, to meet them where they are, understand what their touch points are and present. Our lifestyle, present who we are. And does that truly work for them? Uh, it may not in every case. And I can tell you there’s been times that we’ve redirected people, based on this option, might be better for you than coming here. Uh, at the end of the day, our community is not going to take the place of the memories that were made in your house. Our community may not be the home cooking that you’re used to, but our community may be the opportunity to create new memories and it may alleviate the burden of cooking. Uh, so I think that’s sort of the critical piece is to present our lifestyle and tailoring it to who we’re talking to figure out is that where they need to be.

Hanh:
So you mentioned something about stereotype or the stigma. So senior living communities are often criticized for being too institutionalized, monotonous and depressing. So what’s your take on this?

Blair:
I think there’s some, I think that kind of goes both ways. Uh, I think. Certainly, the funding involved, especially at the SNIF level has been either reduced or stagnant for years. So I think that has tied some hands in terms of bringing statics up to what might be a more current, but there’s always going to be an innate responsibility on the providers part to stay current, to acknowledge your clientele, and to evolve with the expectations of your audience. So, I do believe that there are a lot of opportunity. There is a lot of opportunity to partner with vendors, and that’s why I try not to avoid too many vendor calls because they’re the ones that may have something at the forefront, something they’re doing new, a new offering. So, I think it’s important to feel those calls, and to use that relationship, to help explore some of what’s new that’s out there. Uh, also there’s opportunity to take that from your team members. A lot of team members that work within this industry come from other locations where maybe they’re doing something a bit different there, maybe they’re doing something that’s more progressive than, than we are currently. And do they have the opportunity and the platform at work to introduce some of those ideas I think is really critical. Uh, but it kind of goes back to we’re all in this together. Uh, you and I were kind of talking before we started recording and really about not tuning out what else is going on. And is that in the form of situations like this and learning from people and talking to people and networking, is that the vendor relationship? I think it’s the opportunities are out there to evolve. It’s about, it’s up to the operator to recognize that and to embrace it.

Hanh:
Absolutely. I agree very much so. Well, Hey, I want to acknowledge, appreciate Joe gear, Scott Blakely. Stephanie’s Seravino Scott Blakely. Again for joining. I appreciate you listening. And if you have any questions, please let us know. And if you want to join up on stage, let me know. Okay. So let’s talk about staff retention and recruitment. Okay, well, how does a higher turnover or staff impact the quality of seniors living?

Blair:
Sure. A kind of reference back to what I touched on earlier, the more you turn over it’s. Naturally, people will probably be less vested in the operation. Uh, and it will also demoralize those that are currently there because it probably means they’re working short or they’re having to always train the next person. And let’s face it, that gets tiresome. Uh, so. The peace of mind that goes with continuity of care. Uh, you can’t really put a, a value on that either when that resident gets to know the caregiver gets to know the housekeeper. That’s that’s critical for that person to be comfortable. And also the other way that team member can notice idiosyncrasies or nuances that may change, which is going to happen, especially with the senior population that there could be decline. Uh, there could be an acute episode, but someone who has retention with that relationship we’ll notice that better than if you’re total always cycling through the, the one thing that’s critical that we give to families while it’s the experience for the resident is peace of mind for families. And that I can’t tell you how many times the family member will comment on. Uh, yeah. I talked to. So-and-so housekeeper. And they’re always keeping me up to date on how mom’s doing that. That’s that’s critical. Um, and we, we count on those people being the eyes and ears, you know, from a leadership perspective from a home office level or administrative level. You know, you’re not as intimately involved. Uh, typically that person, that’s bedside in their apartment in their domicile is going to see things through a different lens than we are and their feedback. Once again, do they have the platform then to communicate that feedback is, and the relationship with their team is also critical because that person can see those changes, but there’s not a relationship or a forum to report such. So, then it’s for not so critical.

Hanh:
Yup. I think fundamentally, if you have people in and out, you don’t have that trust that rapport, and it disrupts the relationship between the team members, the staff, but I think most importantly, it disrupts the relationship with the residents. And in my mind, that’s a hardest to establish because again, they’re likely to maybe be dealing with some loss and perhaps not, wanting to open to interest in someone and to, to have that relate or to create that relationship. And once you have that, if you’re in and out, it’s very difficult too.

Blair:
Another piece of that is if you’re constantly turning over the we’ll call it the, the leadership team, the department heads, then your staff is always sort of getting used to the, the nuances of, of this department head versus that one. And what is this? One’s hot buttons versus that one. And that, that can be disruptive as well. I’ve been the new person, a few different places and, you know, line staff will often say I was here before you, and I’ll probably be here after you. Well often they’re right at the managerial level, we turns over quite a bit. The company moves people around, that’s not uncommon. So developing that relationship of trusting one another is, is really, really critical.

Hanh:
Very true stability is everything right? Well, Hey, I want to acknowledge, Hey bromine. Thank you so much for joining and Scott Blakely. Let me take a look. Blair. Why don’t you read some of these comments from our guest?

Blair:
Okay. Let’s see, I am always mindful of budgets and their limitations. At the same time. I would like your comments on implementations of digital technologies, not just for the efficiency they bring for internal work flow, but also patient-centric tech, meaning those digital technologies, which support monitoring of chronic conditions. So sort of goes back to what we touched on earlier about, you know, not being stagnant and being revolutionary. Um, Nope. Number one, I’ll say this for being my age, I think it’s often assumed I’m a bit more tech savvy than I am. Uh, I am certainly not. Uh, so yes or no, they’re the best person to answer this, but I think without a doubt, If using technology can make us do our job more safely and more efficiently, you’re only working against yourself, not to at least acknowledge how that can look really easy, case in point. Um, so we. Well, we’ve been screening it and signing in for how long now. And for a long time it was coming up to the desk and someone having to answer questions and ask questions. And, and, you know, I can’t remember how long ago now, maybe eight months a year, we started using it as a QR code. Which just made it so much more efficient. It also then kept documentation of automatically of everyone that came through our door instead of having to keep it manually. So, I think that just as an example of how using technology to our advantage, and in terms of using it in to patient condition and patient satisfaction, if we can use those, I know there’s one technology out there that can predict fall frequency based on someone’s activity and their stats. So, again, if you can use that to your advantage and keep residents safer and make life more efficient for your staff. No brainer.

Hanh:
Absolutely. Don’t stay in a cave, right. Open your mind open to learn open, to adapt. And I see some great innovations in technology and clearly the adoption of it. It’s, you know, it’s kind of like this, but I think there’s hope, right. You can’t just have technology out there and expect the senior folks. So even you and I, I’m a senior to jump on it. Right. So I think be patient be mindful of them. And also I think they want to trust you and your product before. Jumping on board. Okay.

Blair:
Scott brings up a good point. I’ll just say technology info has to be measurable and actionable. Otherwise it becomes investment exercise in futility. I totally agree. And I think that idea of making things measurable, not just for technology, but how I operate often. Just having a bit more analytical mind if I can’t measure something, if I can’t see the measurability and track my progress, it really probably isn’t helping me too much in my day to day operation.

Hanh:
I did all that, so great. So let’s talk about, let’s see most communities measure their success by how many residents they can safely therapeutically and meaningfully, meaningfully age with dignity and independence. So how do you explain?

Blair:
I think how I look at that is we have a core philosophy that states we have a responsibility to be full and senior living communities that’s our guiding principles, okay. And inherently, when people hear that, they probably think, well, of course, more full means financially, a better, better standing. We try to look at it more organically, I guess you could say. So the more we talk about, you know, people living a better lifestyle in our communities from a socialization perspective, from a dining perspective, from a health perspective, if we adhere to the idea that we could provide a better lifestyle for someone at our community than they would. Outside, then by the measure of the more full we are then enhancing, bettering, improving more lives. So, by putting an emphasis on occupancy, it’s not simply that it’s the bottom line, although let’s face it, we’ve run businesses, right? That’s important. If we look at it more holistically, we’re also saying we’re endorsing the idea that you can live a better life with us more lives that are living with us more lives that we touched.

Hanh:
Absolutely. I mean, it is a business. You have three parties to satisfy the residents, adult children, and the staff and the investors. So bottom line matters, but at the same time, it’s also enhancing the quality of lives for everyone, for the seniors. So great. Okay. I guess, what are some of the things that you folks do to retain quality staff? I know that you mentioned several. Do you have any more to add to that?

Blair:
Uh, Having the opportunity to grow from within is critical. I’m a product of that. I’ll pick out Sam Cario from Indiana. The Stratford in Carmel, Indiana. Every time I do a site visit with Sam, he reels off another handful of people that he’s promoted from within, which is, I think, is a beautiful thing. Many people in the industry want to grow. They want the opportunity to grow. Uh, and if they’re not going to grow with you, chances are they’re going to grow somewhere else. Right. And especially now a lot of people in senior living those assets and those talents, they have they’re transferable. You can work in, in hospitality. You can work in tech, you can work in, we have, you know, when we do a lot of outreach, you could, you could touch base with someone that says hey, I love what you do with that community. You could be good on my team. Those I, those opportunities are, are present abound. So, if we are not embracing the opportunity to promote from within. Um, chances are we, we lose those, those people. Uh, I think the on boarding process is critical. I mentioned earlier, we have a lot of turnover in that first 30 to 60 days. So I think how you on board someone, how you match them up is really important in the introduction to your community, not having them hit the floor until they are fully, fully ready. We actually had one community, I was at, we used sort of a contract that the new team member would distinctly clarify that, yes, I feel like I’ve received the training I need and I’m ready to go. So, it’s sort of a mutual contract that, okay, we’re all on the same page for you to hit the floor? I think that that’s really important. It’s about equipping people with what they need to do to do their job well, whether we’ve talked a lot about technology, whether that’s technology or the right equipment. Prople want to hear that the right linens that they need, anything like that. And again, if you have a company that’s so far removed from hearing those nuances, those intimate requests, you stand to lose people, If you’re not listening.

Hanh:
Yeah, absolutely. So basically equipping them to, to grow and to win. But then also be very happy for them to launch off, right? Because you don’t want people to stay with you for the sake of just sticking around. You want people that want to thrive and grow and be ready to support them in their next steps.

Blair:
And I promote that with, with our, at the department head level two, if you are not sort of looking at your department and figuring out who’s next to do your job. Uh, that way you can take time off or then you could step away. Or if you get asked to do a stretch assignment that someone could maybe fill in some of the, your day to day tasks, if you are not grooming that bench to some degree, you’re, in my opinion, you’re missing a key component of what it takes to lead and manage.

Hanh:
Very true. So now, do you ever play music for seniors who are having memory issues? Like if so, what kind of music do you play?

Blair:
Yeah, I’ll answer that two ways. I’ve I’ve I have a personal aside to that, but I’ve been a part of different initiatives that have allowed for music players, music devices, especially really critical in memory care. Music, you know, you kind of get the play list from the family, usually contributes, Hey, what did your mom or dad really like to listen to? And then you are able to play music that, you know, put on the device, and it’s amazing what music can do. It’s sort of a natural healer. I’ve seen music take some of the most, call it chaotic situations and really just kind of bring it down a level, it settles it. Personally, it’s been a great privelage for me. I’ve played the piano since I was seven. And I’ve been called on when the entertainer didn’t show up. Or, I remember during the height of the pandemic which you could say it’s whenever you want to measure the height, but a while back, instead of having large group gatherings, we wheeled the electric piano into the hallways and folks would come out into their doorway and listen to the piano. And we sort of were creative in that, and it was one of the most touching memories I have, is to dance with her. And I played their wedding song from years ago. So, you have the opportunity through music to make memories like that, which, you know, not everything gives you that sort of platform of a beautiful thing.

Hanh:
It sure is. I have an appreciation for music, you know, and you’re very multitalented so, you know, what a blessing for you to be in the industry to serve the seniors the way that you do. So now, how has working with seniors changed your outlook on life aging and dementia?

Blair:
Yeah. Uh, unless exposed to a senior living community and you know, what it takes from the transition of moving the finances of aging. You aren’t just naturally exposed to a lot of that just in day-to-day life. So getting into it, we are then in a position to consult with others that are going through what is typically a fairly turbulent and unknown process to them. Uh, I think one of the best things I’ve gotten out of it is realizing no one was born in a retirement community. No one was born in a health center. People come from a past and a background that should be acknowledged and appreciated and respected. This generation we’re dealing with now has served the country in, in terms of, you know, war and they’ve served the country in terms of infrastructure and building the country to what it is. So it’s, it’s definitely given me a, a different appreciation and just realizing, that those past or something to be celebrated when I walk into a residence room or their apartment, one of the best things that I always experienced is seeing their life sort of laid out in front of you. And again, you just for better or worse, you don’t get that in every environment. And again, that’s why this job is not for everybody. Sometimes it’s emotional and sometimes it’s a lot for people to bring home to, you know, to say, leave it at work or leave it at home is easier said than done. But it’s definitely given me an appreciation of those that helped build this country. We have a lot to give back to them in this role.

Hanh:
Absolutely. You know, of course it’s difficult, but what an honor, what a privilege to uphold that heritage, that they come to the community, right. And what our responsibility to do. And so, I think folks that are in the industry, just like what you said first and foremost, they gotta have the heart.

Blair:
Yup. Yup. Yeah. Again, if you’re there’s jobs out there for everybody, if, if you’re not naturally inclined to serve. Uh, I challenge of senior living is, is the right path, the right employment for you.

Hanh:
Yeah. Yeah, that’s great. Well, you know, there’s a few questions that Blair and I will try to answer maybe through messaging, but we’re at the later part right now. I just want to wrap it up with a few thoughts. So clearly the senior living industry is fraught with challenges, but it’s also vital in growing sector. So we’ll keep you updated with the latest developments in this space. So make sure that you subscribe to our YouTube channel. And in the meantime, if you’re considering a career in senior living, or just curious about what it’s like, we’ll stay tuned for upcoming series and working in the industry in feel free to reach out to Blair and I. In perhaps let us know what other topics that you want to hear for next week. Our topic will be senior housing. Is it a lifestyle choice or a medical necessity? Our guests will be Calvin Schnure. He is the vice president, senior vice president Research and. Economic Analysis at NAREIT. And another topic next week will be Parkinson’s disease. Is it a paradigm of aging with doctor Alfonzo Fasano. He’s the professor of medicine, neurology at the University of Toronto. So I appreciate your interest and your time. And I can’t wait to see you next week again. And thank you so much for tuning in.

Blair:
Thank you, Hanh.

Hanh:
Thank you.

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